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Former Austin official named Director of Finance for City of Kyle

Thursday, November 4, 2010 by Mark Richardson

Perwez Moheet, the former deputy director of the Austin Water Utility, has been named Director of Finance for the City of Kyle. Moheet served in a variety of positions at the City of Austin for 30 years before retiring in April 2010.

 

“We are excited to have someone with the experience of Perwez join our staff,” said interim city manager James R. Earp. “Perwez has extensive knowledge and experience in the administration and management of municipal government and will be a great asset as we continue to develop our fiscal policies moving forward.”

 

Moheet is a graduate of University of Texas at Austin where he received his Bachelor of Business Accounting degree. He completed his requirements for licensing as a Certified Public Accountant in 1985.

 

Moheet retired from AWU following an investigation into hiring practices in the department. (See In Fact Daily, April 7, 2010)

 

“I am excited at the opportunity to be a part of the City of Kyle organization and look forward to serving the City Council, City Management, and the citizens of Kyle,” Moheet said. He was selected from a field of 107 applicants for the job. While most of the applicants were from Texas, applications were received from as far away as New York and California.

 

The City of Kyle has been one of the fastest growing cities in Texas since 2000, seeing the population grow from just under 5,000 to approximately 30,000. The budget for the city’s current fiscal year is $54.6 million, up from $10.7 million in the 2003-04.

 

The Director of Finance is responsible for assisting in the planning, development, implementation, and maintenance of all financial records, systems, and operations of in Kyle.

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