Monday, December 8, 2014 by Austin Monitor

Mayoral, Council candidates still spending money

(This report was written by Monitor reporters Jo Clifton and Elizabeth Pagano.)

There seems little doubt that the 2014 campaign for mayor will end up being the most expensive in the city’s history. Both Steve Adler and Mike Martinez, as well as political action committees supporting and opposing them, have filled the airwaves with television commercials and filled our mailboxes with expensive glossy fliers.

In the six weeks covered by the most recent contribution and expenditure reports, filed Monday with the City Clerk, the Adler campaign raised $402,679 and spent $402,637. Martinez raised $122,245 and spent $110,618 between Oct. 26 and Dec. 6.

Adler’s report includes 377 pages of contributors. Martinez’s report includes 104 pages of contributors. Some donors, of course, gave to both campaigns, including businesswoman Diana Zuniga.

Martinez loaned his campaign $100,000 and Adler loaned his campaign $306,000. Neither one has paid himself back any of the funds loaned to the campaign.

Adler reported that he had a little more than $26,000 unspent, and Martinez had nearly $44,000 in the bank on Saturday. However, there are always more expenses with a campaign,  and it seems unlikely that either candidate will be able to pay himself back much of what was loaned, if any.

Among the political action committees supporting Adler are the Austin Police Association PAC and the Progress for Austin PAC, whose treasurer is Marc Winkleman.

The Adler campaign did not list any bundlers, people who raise money on behalf of the candidates. The Martinez campaign listed five bundlers: Emmanuel Loo of AEM; JP Urrabazo of Longbow Partners LP; Tristan Casteneda of Longbow Partners LP; Scott Roberts, owner of Salt Lick BBQ; and Ryan Runkle, an attorney with Hotze, Runkle PLLC.

Adler paid political consultant David Butts, who has seen his share of controversy lately, $4,000 per month in November and December. Campaign manager Jim Wick received more than $5,000 a month. Martinez’s campaign manager, Matt Parkerson, received $6,000 for his work during November, and campaign consultant Nick Hudson got about $3,500 the same month.

Martinez got 30 percent of the vote and Adler got 37 percent of the vote on Nov. 4. Early voting started last week and will continue through Friday for the Dec. 16 runoff election.

District 1

On Nov. 4, Ora Houston earned 49.12 percent of the vote, compared to her opponent, DeWayne Lofton, who decided to battle it out in the runoff election despite earning only 14.41 percent.

With the field narrowed to just two candidates, Houston continued to dominate fundraising in District 1. Houston raised $22,935, and at the time of reporting, had $17,748 in cash on hand. In comparison, Lofton raised $4,645 during that same period. Lofton has $6,136 remaining — but loaned his campaign $10,000.

Notable donors for Houston during this last period include AFSCME, the Austin Apartment Association PAC Committee, the Austin Firefighters Association Political Committee, the Austin Police Association PAC, the Austin/ Travis County EMS Employee Association PAC, former Council Member Betty Dunkerly, Austin Cooperative Business Association Executive Director Brian Donovan, the HBA Home PAC, the National Caucus & Center on Black Aging, Inc., President and CEO Karyne Jones, former Planning Commissioner Saundra Kirk, LAN PAC, Southwest Laborers District Council PAC, and SW LIUNA PAC.

Lofton received contributions from several entities, including the Travis County Sheriff’s Law Enforcement Association PAC.

District 3

Though it was the most crowded with candidates during the general election, District 3 has also been whittled down to two: siblings Susana Almanza and Sabino “Pio” Renteria. Both benefited from the city’s Fair Campaign Fund, which awarded them each $27,988.58.

Renteria ended the period with $42,358.58 in contributions, with $34,551.88 remaining on hand. Before the runoff election, Renteria had raised $5,734 and loaned his campaign $1,300.

Among Renteria’s donors were Texas Democratic Party Director Glen Maxey, Heywood Hotel owner Kathey Setzer, Alfred Stanley, the Stonewall Democrats PAC, the South Austin Democrats PAC, the IBEW PAC, Shudde Fath, the Austin Apartment Association PAC, SW LIUNA PAC, the Southwest Laborers District Council PAC, LAN PAC, and the AFSCME PAC.

Almanza ended this reporting period with $34,015.58 in political contributions, with $21,063.89 in cash remaining. Before this last period, Almanza had raised a total of $20,765.

Almanza’s contributors include PODER Director Antonio Diaz, a $3,000 in-kind contribution from La Voz newspaper (for an advertisement), Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE) Director Maria Loya, and Environmental Board Member Marisa Perales.

On Nov. 4, Almanza has a slight advantage with 20.98 percent, compared to Renteria’s 18.8 percent.

District 4

Aside from the mayor’s race, District 4 has been the City Council race that has garnered the most news coverage — especially since the Nov. 4 election. The media seems to have been to the benefit of Greg Casar, who has raised more than $54,0000 more than his opponent, Laura Pressley.

In this last reporting period Casar has raised $77,774.11, and has $35,317.40 left on hand. Pressley has raised $23,200, and has $7,384 on hand.

Casar’s prominent supporters include the Austin Board of Realtors PAC, the Austin Firefighters Public Safety Fund, the Sierra Club Political Committee of Texas, the Travis County Democratic Party, Bicycle Sport Shop owner William Abel, AFSCME PEOPLE, the Austin Police Department PAC, the Austin/ Travis County EMS Employee Association PAC, Bury President Paul Bury, AFL-CIO organizer Aaron Chappell, Planning Chair Danette Chimenti, HBA HOME PAC, IBEW PAC Voluntary Fund, LAN-PAC, Casa Marianella Director Jennifer Long, Perry Lorenz, Texas Democratic Party’s Glen Maxey, North by Northwest Democrats, Tom Nuckols, Sheet Metal Workers Local Union No. 67 Local PAC, Southwest Laborers District Council SWLDC PAC, Stonewall Democrats of Austin PAC, SW LIUNA PAC, the United Association of Journeymen & Apprentices et al, the Joaquin Castro Committee and Lloyd Doggett for Congress.

Casar’s campaign also reported two bundlers: Capital Metro operator Solomon Kassa and Stan’s Heat and Air Conditioning President Christopher Strand.

Pressley’s notable donors include attorney Bill Aleshire, former District 3 candidate Shaun Ireland, Board of Adjustment Chair Jeff Jack, Marathon Kids community programs coordinator (and Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission member) Carmen Llanes, former District 4 candidate Marco Mancillas and former candidate for mayor David Orshalick.

On Nov. 4, Casar earned 38.64 percent of the vote, compared to Pressley’s 21.55 percent.

District 6

When the votes were counted on Nov. 4, only 25 votes separated District 6 candidates Don Zimmerman and Jimmy Flannigan. Both men have been working to get out their message, and most political observers won’t hazard a guess as to who will win in the farthest northern district.

Republican Zimmerman reported raising $32,130 and spending $30,837 during the six weeks leading up to Saturday. He repaid himself $6,000 from a loan made earlier, but the campaign still owes him $20,000.

Democrat Flannigan reported raising more than $41,000 and spending a little more than $21,000 during the most recent time period. He has not loaned his campaign any money.

Flannigan also reported that he has support from the Austin Board of Realtors PAC, Austinites for Equity, a labor union PAC, the Sierra Club Political Committee of Texas and the Travis County Democratic Party.

He also reported support from the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, the AFSCME People PAC and the Southwest Laborers District Council PAC.

Zimmerman did not report support from any political action committee or from the local Republican Party, although he may have it informally. received contributions from both the Travis County Republican Party and Texans for Accountable Government.

District 7

In District 7, Leslie Pool and Jeb Boyt are in the runoff. Pool also received $27,988.58 from the city’s Fair Campaign Fund, bringing her total to $46,353.58, with $18,135.24 left in on-hand cash. Pool has loaned her campaign $40,500.

Boyt raised $12,132 in that same period, and has $19,759.99 left on hand. Boyt also loaned his campaign $38,025.

Pool’s notable donors include the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees-AFL-CIO, the Austin Firefighters Association PAC, the Austin/Travis County EMS Employee Association PAC, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers PAC, Board of Adjustment Chair Jeff Jack, Planning Commission Chair Danette Chimenti, Stonewall Democrats of Austin PAC, and UA Local 286.

Boyt’s donors include the Austin Apartment Association PAC, the Austin Board of Realtors PAC, the RECA-Good Government PAC, and Garner Stoll.

During the first go-round in November, Pool won 32.14 percent of the vote. Boyt won 16.89 percent.

District 8

In District 8, neighborhood advocate Ed Scruggs is facing off with conservative Ellen Troxclair. In the Nov. 4 election, it was a tight race. Troxclair had 26.38 percent of the vote, and Scruggs had 25.55 percent.

There was a clearer winner in fundraising this period, with Troxclair raising $53,805.38 and Scruggs $37,151.28.

Troxclair’s contributors included the AFA PAC, the Austin Apartment Association, the Austin Board of Realtors, Roger Borgelt, Bury, Inc. President Paul Bury, Travis County Commissioner Gerald Daugherty, Railroad Commissioner Carlos Espinosa, Texas Policy Analyst Justin Hale, HBA Home PAC, Environmental Board Member James Schissler, the Travis County Republican Party and former City Council candidate Jay Wiley.

Scruggs had donors that included Austinites for Equality, Sierra Club Political Committee of Texas, the Travis County Democratic Party, AFSCME People, Austin/Travis County EMS Employee Association PAC, Save Our Springs Executive Director Bill Bunch, David Butts, Shudde Fath, ANC President Mary Ingle, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers PAC, Board of Adjustment Chair Jeff Jack, North by Northwest Democrats, activist Paul Robbins, Sheet Metal Workers Local Union No 67 Local PAL, South Austin Democrats, Southwest Laborers District Council PAC, Stonewall Democrats of Austin PAC, SW LIUNA PAC, Austin Sierra Club’s Roy Waley, and Lloyd Doggett for Congress.

District 10

Mandy Dealey, who led opponent Sheri Gallo into this runoff election with 30 percent of the vote compared to Gallo’s 23 percent, outpaced her opponent in fundraising during the most recent contribution period. Dealey reported raising nearly $87,000 and spending more than $82,000 between Oct. 26 and Dec. 6.

Gallo reported raising a little more than $70,000 and spending nearly $47,000. She did not report that she has loaned her campaign any money. Dealey loaned her campaign $50,000 during the months before the initial election. On Monday, she reported that the campaign currently owes her a little more than $35,000.

Gallo also reported support from the Austin Apartment Association PAC and two political action committees set up by the Home Builders Association of Greater Austin.

Dealey has support from the two different political action committees of the Austin Firefighters Association, as well as the Austin Police Association PAC, the Austin/Travis County EMS Employee Association PAC and AFSCME People of Washington DC.

Dealey reported two bundlers: Solomon Kassa of Lone Star Cab and Chris Strand of Stan’s Heating & Air Conditioning.

 

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Key Players & Topics In This Article

Austin City Council November 2014 Elections: The November 2014 Austin City Council elections marked a shift from an all-at-large City Council to one elected based mostly on geographic districts. The city's Mayor remains elected at-large.

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